NÚMERO DE TELEFONE

+1 (407) 866-8733

E-MAIL

abc@studyworkus.com

Pesquisar
Close this search box.

Understanding the August Visa Bulletin: Impact on India’s EB-1 Category

The August Visa Bulletin is out and it has brought some significant changes for the immigrant community, especially for those waiting for their green cards. The EB-1 category, which covers a range of highly-skilled workers including researchers, professors, and executives, has seen a major setback for Indian applicants. The visa bulletin shows a 9-year, 11-month regression for India in the EB-1 category, which means applicants will have to wait longer than anticipated to receive their green cards.

This blog post will delve deeper into the EB-1 category and what this regression means for Indian applicants. Blog Body: The EB-1 category is one of the most sought-after visa categories for highly-skilled workers. It is divided into three sub-categories: EB-1A, EB-1B, and EB-1C. EB-1A is for individuals with extraordinary science, arts, education, business, or athletics abilities. EB-1B is for outstanding professors and researchers. And, EB-1C is for executives and managers of multinational companies.

The category is popular because it provides priority processing for green cards, meaning the applicants can skip the long waiting lines of other visa categories. However, the recent regression in the EB-1 category will have a significant impact on Indian applicants. It will increase the waiting time, which already stands at more than a decade for Indian applicants in the EB-2 and EB-3 categories.

 

 

 

 

 

The regression means that Indian applicants who have been waiting for their green cards for years will have to wait even longer, while new applicants will join the queue at the back. The regression can be attributed to the high demand for green cards in the EB-1 category. The category has an annual quota of 28.6% of employment-based green cards, which is around 40,000 green cards per year. However, the demand for the category is much higher than the supply, leading to a backlog. According to the Department of State, the current demand for the EB-1 category has exceeded the annual quota, leading to regression.

 

 

 

 

The regression in the EB-1 category highlights the need for immigration reform. The current immigration system is outdated and unable to meet the growing demand for green cards. The EB-1 category is just one example of how the system is not working properly. It is time for policymakers to consider comprehensive immigration reform that takes into account the needs of both employers and employees. This is especially important for highly-skilled workers, whose contribution to the economy is significant.

Conclusion: The August Visa Bulletin has brought some significant changes for Indian applicants in the EB-1 category. The regression means that the waiting time will be longer for applicants who have already been waiting for years, and new applicants will join the queue at the back. The high demand for green cards in the category highlights the need for immigration reform that includes comprehensive solutions to address the needs of both employers and employees. We hope that policymakers consider a comprehensive approach to reforming the immigration system to ensure that the process is fair, efficient, and consistent for all.

LEGAL DISCLAIMER

The information provided on this post does not, and is not intended to, constitute legal advice; instead, all information, content, and materials available on my posts are for general informational purposes only.

Disclaimer: This article is for informational purposes only and should not be considered legal advice. It is highly recommended to seek the advice of an immigration lawyer before making any decisions.

Disclaimer: The information provided herein does not, and is not intended to, constitute legal advice; instead, all information, content, and materials available on this site are for general informational purposes only. 

Any and all information by or on this Site is provided for promotional or informational purposes only and is not to be relied upon as a professional opinion whatsoever. This includes all digital content, including but not exhaustive of, email, blog, podcasts, events, any and all social media ( inclusive of: Facebook and Instagram ), webinars and other content whether or not they are available for purchase, as resources or education and information only.

Readers of this post/article/video should contact their attorney to obtain advice with respect to any particular legal matter.  No reader, user, or browser of this site should act or refrain from acting on the basis of information on this site without first seeking legal advice from counsel in the relevant jurisdiction.